Labatt grows

Over 164 years, Labatt grows from a single, small brewery in London, Ontario to a Canadian business icon and key part of the Anheuser-Busch InBev family – the world’s largest brewer.

Labatt leads in labour and employee relations

Labatt practices its belief that great companies are formed by great people. They are behind everything we do and are our only sustainable competitive advantage.

Community support and donations

Soon after the company’s founding, John Kinder Labatt establishes the philosophy that endures to today – with our time, expertise and financial resources, we will support the communities where we do business.

Environmental awareness

Labatt and the Canadian brewing industry are leaders in establishing recycling and water and energy reduction programs.

Sports sponsorships

Beer and sports go together and Labatt’s support for amateur athletes and the fans’ favourite teams and leagues extends to more than a half century.

Serving consumers with innovative products

Labatt’s customers and consumers come first and we constantly look for products, packaging and other innovations that meet their ever changing needs.

Labatt grows

Over 164 years, Labatt grows from a single, small brewery in London, Ontario to a Canadian business icon and key part of the Anheuser-Busch InBev family – the world's largest brewer.

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John Kinder Labatt Samuel Eccles, John K. Labatt’s first business partner in 1847. By 1855, John Kinder Labatt becomes sole owner and renames the brewery John Labatt’s Brewery.

John Kinder Labatt, c. 1864. Born at Mountmellick, Queen’s County, Ireland in 1803.

Lithograph poster advertising John Labatt’s London brewery. An example of excellent 19th century graphic design, Labatt relied upon the factory image promoting the best modern technology of the day.
c. 1870

Lithograph of the Labatt brewery in London, Ontario with insets of founder John Kinder Labatt and his son John Labatt II.

Labatt’s London brewery c. 1870

After the fire of 1874, John Labatt II rebuilds his London brewery in record time, a marvel of technology with enviable capacity.

Advertisement promoting John Labatt’s Ale & Stout as medal winners in an international brewing competition establishing Labatt’s superior quality and excellence.
1892

John Labatt Brewer. Advertising poster featuring the “Two Gentlemen in the Parlour,” a popular theme used throughout Labatt’s advertising into the early 20th century. Labatt astutely marketed respectability associated with his quality beverages, stout, porter & ale. c. 1894

Advertising poster for Labatt’s Ale & Stout, showcasing its excellence in brewing quality and taste as well as modernity in the factory image. c.1900

John Labatt II
c. 1910

John Sackville Labatt 1932

On August 14, 1934 John Sackville Labatt is kidnapped en route to a board meeting and the news travels quickly across the country.

Labatt expands in Ontario, purchasing the Copland brewery in Toronto in 1946

The Pioneer Brewery’s grand opening featuring Labatt
executives, John Henderson Moore (centre). 1967

John Labatt Limited’s new corporate headquarters are a result of a million dollar restoration project on London’s Ridout Street in 1970.

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Labatt leads in labour and employee relations

Labatt practices its belief that great companies are formed by great people. They are behind everything we do and are our only sustainable competitive advantage.

Please click on any image to view in full size

Portrait of brewery workers in the Malt House c. 1900

United Brewery Workers’ band, Labatt’s Clown Syncopaters

Labatt salesmen or "travellers" as they were called, gather at the launch of Old London Brew, "The new beer with the old quality". c. 1918

Labatt delivers kegs by horse and wagon in the early 20th century

Brewery workers unite in the Labour Day parade featuring festooned Labatt delivery wagons. c. 1925

Delivering Labatt’s product to the Brewer’s Retail Store by horse & wagon. c. 1930

Keg washing at the brewery. c. 1930

John Sackville Labatt and family with Superior Transportation personnel outside London brewery. 1931

The Cooper applies the bung remover to a wooden keg c. 1935

Keg racking c. 1935

Labatt’s Export Ale… worth trying! Labatt advertising is featured on a wall calendar issued in 1936.

Union Contract Signing 1940

Print Ad Montreal newspapers, 1940 C’est surtout dans les épiceries que nous avons remarqué la vogue de la Labatt, Commandez par telephone Labatt…ne coute pas plus.

Touring the brewery’s keg aging and storage operation c. 1940

Inspecting the brew kettle c. 1947

Hand painted John Labatt Limited Safety Award

Bottling line Workers packaging Labatt’s India Pale Ale c. 1951

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Community support and donations

Soon after the company's founding, John Kinder Labatt establishes the philosophy that endures to today – with our time, expertise and financial resources, we will support the communities where we do business.

Please click on any image to view in full size

Labatt Memorial Park in London, Ontario is donated back to the city of London in 1940.

In 1941, Labatt forms the Army Mechanics Trade School, transforming its garages into training facilities. At the same time, Labatt salesmen and equipment service men take midnight shifts to learn technical skills in tool making and manufacturing. During the war, the machine shop filled over 200 contracts and 40,000 equipment parts for the allies’ planes, trucks, guns and ships.

John Labatt Limited’s support for the war effort is emblazoned on it’s beer cartons.

During the war years, Labatt delivers cases of IPA overseas to the troops.

John Labatt Limited provides driver training to war amputees, continuing its unwavering support of veterans after WWII.1946

Labatt conducts Safe Driving clinics for the general public from their demonstration vehicle. c. 1949
Lacking the traditional bottle of champagne for christening the bridge, they appropriately resort to its namesake, 50 Anniversary Ale. c. 1950 Labatt’s Roadside Assistance program provides aid to stranded motorists on highways and at accidents everywhere. c.1955

Labatt’s moderation and responsible enjoyment campaign print ad, 1985 Homing Device. Please Don’t Drink and Drive.

Labatt’s moderation and responsible enjoyment campaign, “Morning After,” shows the consequences of not drinking responsibly. A still frame from “Tattoo”. 1996

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Environmental awareness

Labatt and the Canadian brewing industry are leaders in establishing recycling and water and energy reduction programs

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The London brewery establishes its brewing operation in full view enabling its visitors to witness its high standards of brewing quality c. 1950

Labatt brochure outlining the company’s commitment to protecting the environment. c. 1970.

Announcing the Kokanee Conservation Club. The Reasons to Join Are All Around Us. Hand painted artwork of the Columbia Brewery amidst the flora and fauna of the landscape. "We've Got It. Let's Keep It." Created by Bern Wheeler Communications, the club was started by Columbia Brewery in an effort to preserve BC's Okanagan and Kootenays. c. 1980

 

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Sports sponsorships

Beer and sports go together and Labatt's support for amateur athletes and the fans' favourite teams and leagues extends to more than a half century.

Please click on any image to view in full size

Labatt 50 print ad, c. 1960. Put More Life in Your Living! Enjoy yourself…take 5 for 50 Ale Labatt 50, print ad, 1961 “Take five” for fifty ale. Watch Canadian Pro Football on the CTV Network, brought to you by Labatt’s. Labatt sponsors the CFL telecasts in 1961. “Take five” for fifty ale is a popular slogan.

Labatt 50 print ad, 1961 Voici Labatt… Y A Rien Qui La Batte! Brasée dans le Quebec, au gout du Quebec

Labatt Blue salutes the Toronto Blue Jay’s back-to-back World Series Champions wins in 1992 and 1993

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Serving consumers with innovative products

Labatt's customers and consumers come first and we constantly look for products, packaging and other innovations that meet their ever changing needs.

Please click on any image to view in full size

Bottle label John Labatt’s India Pale Ale, originating from an old English recipe in 1864. Bottle label Labatt’s Crystal Lager c. 1900

Print Ad – Labatt’s India Pale Ale – 1934. When you serve ale to people who know, see that it’s brewed in the Old Country tradition

Original Streamliner concept drawing No. 3 by designer Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky. c. 1935

Original Streamliner concept drawing No. 5A by designer Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky. c. 1935

Original Streamliner concept drawing No. 6 by designer Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky. c. 1935

Original Streamliner concept drawing No. 8 by designer Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky. c. 1935

Equipment Service Fleet 1939.

Labatt’s Equipment Service fleet.

Fleet of Streamliner delivery trucks 1930’s.

The Streamliner takes to the road. c. 1947

John Labatt’s Anniversary Ale is introduced in 1950, celebrating brothers John and Hugh’s 50 years at the company.

Hugh and John Labatt enjoy happy moments (with hairbrushes). c. 1950

Original Labatt’s Pilsener bottle label
c. 1951

Frank Dubuc, an employee at the Montreal brewery, dresses as a lumberjack to meet Hugh Labatt. His moniker, Monsieur Cinquante, fits and Labatt adopts this spokesperson for the brand in Quebec until 1970. Frank Dubuc was Quebec’s first pensioner, retiring in 1970.

Labatt advertises its new streamlined series of labels for its signature brands on its freight car. c. 1954
Labatt’s Anniversary Ale is soon known as 50. The 50 label features the portrait of John S. Labatt, its creator. 1954 Labatt’s Pilsener label features the portrait of Hugh Labatt, who garnered the recipe from his journey to Pilsen, Czech Republic. 1954

Labatt’s Crystal label features the portrait of John K. Labatt, its creator. 1954

Labatt’s India Pale Ale label features the portrait of John Labatt II, who brought back the recipe from his internship in Wheeling, West Virginia. 1954

A print ad marking IPA’s new label design “A Man’s Drink.” The swing is definitely to Labatt’s! c. 1954

Print ad for Cool Spring, 1976 …makes light of a heavy thirst, a forerunner of low alcohol beers. Launched in Alberta and BC, Cool Spring is Labatt’s introduction of the first low alcohol beer in 1972.

Labatt Blue, print ad, 1976 Blue Eyes. “When you’re smiling Call for Labatt’s Blue”

Labatt Blue print ad, 1976 Blue Jeans. “When you’re smiling Call for Labatt’s Blue”

Labatt 50 print ad, 1978. “You can’t say beer any better”

Brewed for you by Labatt’s. Budweiser in Canada. An enterprise of Labatt Brewing Company Limited. 1980. Labatt has acquired the exclusive license to brew Budweiser in Canada.

What a fabulous year to come to Alberta! Budweiser is brewed and launched in Alberta first. 1980

Introducing Budweiser now brewed here by Labatt’s Ontario – “This Bud’s for you.” 1980

Print ad for Labatt Blue and Labatt 50, 1981 Après Ski. Labatt’s 50. Labatt’s Blue. Beer at its Best.

Print ad for Labatt 50, 1982 Prize catch.

Labatt 1919 keg truck.

The Streamliner postcard.

Stylized illustration of the 1947 Streamliner produced for the commemorative Historic Land Vehicles stamp series by Canada Post in 1996.

 

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